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Christian Fiction Scavenger Hunt Stop #27

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THE HUNT HAS ENDED! THANK YOU ALL SO VERY MUCH FOR COMING BY!!! Welcome to the 2020 Christian Fiction Scavenger Hunt! I am SO very excited to get to take part.  If you've just discovered the hunt, be sure to start at Stop #1, and collect the clues through all the stops, in order, so you can enter to win one of our top 5 grand prizes! The hunt BEGINS on 10/15 at noon MST with Stop #1 at LisaTawnBergren.com . Hunt through our loop using Chrome or Firefox as your browser ( not Explorer). There is NO RUSH to complete the hunt--you have all weekend (until Sunday, 10/18 at midnight MST)! So take your time, reading the unique posts along the way; our hope is that you discover new authors/new books and learn new things about them. Submit your entry for the grand prizes by collecting the CLUE on each author's scavenger hunt post and submitting your answer in the Rafflecopter form at the final stop, back on Lisa's site. Many authors are offering additional prizes along the way! S

Story Connections!

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For those of you who have ever wondered whether my stories are connected (most are!) and which characters show up again or are mentioned elsewhere ... this is for you! Defending Truth in A Pioneer Christmas Collection, takes place in 1780, just after the Battle of Kings Mountain, during the American Revolution. The couple featured in this story, Truth Bledsoe and Micah Elliot, show up again in The Cumberland Bride, which features Truth's little brother Thomas, 14 years later. The Highwayman (formerly in The Most Eligible Bachelor Collection and now available as a single e-book or part of To Catch A Bachelor from Winged Publications) takes place in 1775, on the eve of the American Revolution. Sam Wheeler and Sally Brewster are the featured couple, and one of their grandsons, Josh Wheeler, is the male lead of The Rebel Bride. The Counterfeit Tory in The Backcountry Brides Collection takes place in late 1781, as the American Revolution is winding down, and features Jed Wheel

Thoughts on faith, or the lack thereof

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This was originally written as a response to a family member who shared that the questions posed by the lead singer of a prominent Christian band, admitting he had questioned his faith for years and finally abandoned it in great relief, were questions she shared. I know others share the same questions and doubts. And while it feels like the social dialogue has suddenly changed, it's my belief that it really hasn't--that these issues are so basic to the Christian worldview, and much could be remedied by proper knowledge and understanding of what the Bible actually says, I decided to make my response public. I welcome questions--but reserve the right to delete unhelpful comments. So if you have questions about the faith and feel that no one has ever adequately addressed them--this is for you. I pray you find a deeper understanding, and ever-deeper trust in the only One who can ever make sense of all the madness. First … questions are normal. Doubts are normal. It’s what you

The Rebel Bride release day!

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Release Day!!! Ahem. Pardon me while I squee a little. Today marks the official release date of my fifth--count 'em, FIVE--published title. I can hardly believe it. This was my second-hardest story to write. (The one coming out in March 2020 rates as my hardest.) In fact, as I state in the reader's note, I never wanted to write a Civil War story, and yet ... here it is. God has a really keen sense of irony.

Shenandoah Hearts by Carrie Fancett Pagels

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This week I'm featuring the first novella in The Backcountry Brides Collection, titled Shenandoah Hearts, by the woman who started it all! Carrie Fancett Pagels founded the team blog Colonial Quills 7 years ago this month (we celebrate TOMORROW with another tea party), and an all-colonial novella collection has been her dream for quite a while now. Shenandoah Hearts is set in 1754 on the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia down into the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. As the French-Indian War commences, Magda Sehler wonders if Jacob Owens lost his mind to have abandoned his Philadelphia business and moved to the Shenandoah Valley. Or has he lost his heart? Of the setting, Carrie writes: Jacob Owens is a prosperous merchant, owning and running a Philadelphia shop. He’s had the wonderful ladysmith, Madga Sehler, working with his family for years. But the Sehler family is relocating to the Shenandoah region of what is today Virginia. This backcountry area was dangerous.

Love's Undoing, with Gabrielle Meyer

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Continuing with the settings of the Backcountry Brides novellas, today I'm hosting Gabrielle Meyer with Love's Undoing. Gabrielle writes: My story begins in what would one day become central Minnesota on the banks of the Upper Mississippi River in 1792 at a Scottish fur post. Abi is the daughter of a Scottish fur trader and an Indian mother. Early in the story, she leaves the post and travels to Montreal to find her sister. She and the hero, Henry, are accompanied by a Chippewa guide, Migizi, and the man her father hopes she’ll marry, Robert. She longs to get away from the confines and expectations of the fur post and see what the world has to offer. I loved creating the setting, especially at the beginning when they are in the fur post. My daughter and I visited The Northwest Company Fur Post in Pine City, Minnesota, and that was the inspiration for the McCrea fur post in my story. I live in central Minnesota, so it was easy to set Abi and Henry along the

Land of the Noonday Sun, by Jennifer Hudson Taylor

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Welcome to the next installment of The Backcountry Brides settings, and welcome to Jennifer! ~*~*~ Annis Shunk, b. 1832 Deep in the mountains of western North Carolina is an area where the sun’s rays only reach the ground when it is directly overhead during the middle of the day. The Cherokee Indians called this land Nantahala , which means “land of the noonday sun.” This is where I set my Backcountry Brides novella, Heart of Nantahala , in 1757. The Cherokee built a town in Nantahala and called it Aquone, or “by the river.” It consisted of a church, a school, a post office, and a couple of cemeteries. Very little is known of the people in Aquone, as it now lies beneath Nantahala Lake, a man-made lake built in 1942 for electrical power. In 1835, President Andrew Jackson decided to forcibly remove about 15,000 Cherokee from the eastern states of NC, SC, GA, FL, AL, TN, and marched them by military escort to a reservation in Oklahoma. This removal was gruesome, on foot,