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Showing posts from August, 2011

A Review of Ransome's Quest

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The third and final volume of the Ransome Trilogy   by Kaye Dacus is a delightful romp across the Caribbean that neatly wraps up the stories of William and Julia, and Ned and Charlotte, with some wonderful surprises thrown in. It is, predictably, the most fun if the reader is already familiar with the first two installments of the series, Ransome’s Honor and Ransome’s Crossing , and it provides an exciting, sometimes heartwrenching but completely satisfying conclusion to the overall story. It’s a must-read if either of the previous volumes were enjoyed! As I mentioned in previous reviews, I love the blend of Jane Austen (or Georgette Heyer, which was actually my first exposure to Regency romance) and Horatio Hornblower. Kaye’s writing style is so very smooth and in keeping with the time, except for the very occasional slip into modern vernacular. Her love of research shines through with vivid and exact period detail. I could smell the salt breeze and feel the deck of the ship bene

The Anniversary Getaway, Part 4

To finish up my tale of a wonderful surprise 24th anniversary getaway ... I loved the tour of the house and the glimpse behind the scenes of a working bed and breakfast. By the time we left the house—via the backdoor, where we found the kitchen herb garden that obviously provided the fresh basil Katherine had served with sliced tomatoes at breakfast—I was on serious information overload. But here were new and interesting things: for one, the kitchen building, which had been converted to a “man cave” by Robert Weeks, the owner back in the 1930’s, and in which Katherine has experimented with open-hearth cooking. Outside, it’s beautiful, sound old brick. Inside, cypress boards line the entire walls and rafter ceiling. I could only sit and gape. In my head, I was seeing the attic of Laura’s house in A Family To Keep, which has a similar look but in heart pine rather than cypress. Absolutely exquisite. Bruce talked about some the difficulty they’d had after last April’s storms knocked